Sustainable Lifestyle Skills: Mending, Part 1

Sustainable Lifestyle Skills: Mending, Part 1

A big part of leading a sustainable lifestyle is knowing that there are alternatives to buying more things, especially when it comes to our clothes. We already know not to buy fast and cheaply produced fashion, and fortunately there are more brands out there now who are embracing sustainable sourcing and production.

One of the first steps in embracing the slow fashion journey, however, is to use what you already have! Makes sense, right? But what do we do with that garment we’d like to keep wearing if it weren’t for that ripped seam, the loose hem, or that snag that turned into a hole? We do what our grandmothers did. We mend them!

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If you know from the get-go that you’re not one to pick up a needle and thread, consider finding someone who mends professionally and pay for that service. This is a great way to revitalize a loved garment while saving you the money you’d spend on something new, AND a great way to express value for sewing skills!  But if you’re game for an easy way to make your clothes last, spending less time and money in the long run, keep reading! Here are some simple and quick techniques that you can do anytime, and in a pinch. 

 

Mending-series

So how do you start slow with mending your clothes?  We’ve got you covered! Here are some simple and quick techniques to get you started.   We’ll walk you through what you absolutely need, and take each technique step by step.

For now, we recommend that you only invest is two small tools: a hand sewing needle (or small pack of them), and one spool of thread. You might have some lying around from a free gift or hotel visit, or maybe borrow some from a friend. 

Mending-series

Next, using about an arm’s length of thread, thread and knot a needle. To learn how, watch this video tutorial:


And then, if you’re itching to try out sewing, watch this video starting at 3:12. It’ll help you with fixing a hole in one of the sweaters you just pulled out for the winter:

We’ll be posting more quick mending tips in a series of upcoming blog posts, so stay tuned! Or, If you’re more of a hands-on learning type, check out our mending circle throughout our upcoming Slow Living Retreat! We’ll be sharing and learning mending skills together during this special fall weekend. 

Stay tuned!visible-mending-workshop

Save this to your Pinterest boards for later!

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Sustainable Clothing: All About Dyes

Sustainable Clothing: All About Dyes

Walk into any clothing store these days and look around. Garments are available in a vast array of colors, from black, white and neutral tones all the way to neon brights in any hue and everything in between. To the modern day consumer, it’s perfectly normal and expected to have a wide selection of colors to choose from when making a purchase. We value color choice as an expression of our personality and individual taste. But how often do we stop to consider where the color actually comes from, and how all of those garments are dyed?

Synthetic Dyes

Unless clearly stated otherwise, most clothing you buy today has been subjected to synthetic dyes. Synthetic dyes were created in the 1850s, and were a revolutionary way to produce long lasting colorful garments on the cheap, according to Regina Lee Blaszczyk, professor of business history at the University of Leeds. Before this discovery was made through an accidental chemical process in a lab, clothing was dyed using substances found in nature, particularly plants.

Synthetic dyes have come a long way since 1850. We now know that the way most of them are made  (using petrochemicals, aka plastic!) is extremely toxic for the dye handlers and  super harmful for the environment, particularly the waterways of developing countries where garment production is prevalent.  For a closer look at these toxic and inhumane processes check out an excellent documentary called River Blue.

Fiber Reactive Dyes

Fiber reactive dyes are not naturally derived. They are synthetics, but they are considered a more sustainable alternative than most of the synthetics used today. Why? They require WAY less water to produce their color, and their toxicity levels are significantly less than normal synthetic dyes. More conscious clothing brands are turning to this process for less impact on the environment and human health. Learn more here.

Natural Dyes

Natural dyes aren’t created in a lab, they are directly derived from plants and vegetation. Natural dyes are (mostly) non toxic, and are safe to wear on your skin. If a company says they use natural dyes, it means not only that their workers are safe from harmful chemicals but that the clothing you are wearing  is free from the harmful substances found in many synthetic dyes.

Because natural dyeing is a slower, more involved and more expensive process, you can be sure that the fast fashion industry uses synthetic dyes exclusively, with little or no exception.  But in learning about natural dyes, you can help shift the industry by creating a demand for a  more sustainable alternative to fabric color creation. Look for naturally dyed clothing from small boutique and artisan apparel companies, and use your buying power to feel good about what you’re wearing.

You can also have a lot of fun experimenting with natural dyes yourself. There are many techniques, but we’ll be teaching a bundle dyeing workshop at our Lady Farmer Slow Living Retreat in November, where you’ll learn how to use heat to transfer color from various plants onto fabric. In addition to this, you’ll have several other workshops to choose from, including food fermentation basics, sound healing, clean beauty and yoga.

Come play with us and enjoy and entire weekend of slow living, wonderful food, fun and community in the beautiful Catoctin mountains of Maryland, November 15th-17th. Get all the details and register here!

DIY Bundle Dyeing by Jessica Marquez for Design Sponge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Second Life for Shoes: Emma’s Favorite Discount Shoe Store

A question we get a lot is, “How do I know if something is ‘sustainable’ and if I should buy it or not?” Or, “What are some sustainable companies for the things that I need?”

The answer can sometimes be more complicated than it may seem. That’s because “sustainable” is such a broad, vague, and subjective word. At Lady Farmer, we encourage deciding what sustainable means to you, and going from there. As long as you are taking time to make a conscious decision based on personal guidelines you’ve set for yourself, we think that is much better than mindlessly consuming. It’s simply taking back your purchasing power as a consumer!

Enter: The Favorite Second-hand Shoe Store

sustainable-shoes

A few weeks ago my mom and I took our quarterly (sometimes more often) pilgrimage to East Tennessee, where mom is from (and also the setting of her debut novel, Angel ). I’m lucky to have both grandparents still alive and well there, which is so special. I’m also lucky that my favorite second-hand/discount shoe store is there, and that we are usually able to make time for a stop! Most times I don’t actually buy anything, but sometimes that perfect pair appears happily on the shelf in front of me. What’s the most fun is that everything there is usually just in one size and style, so it feels even more completely serendipitous when it does happen.

discount-shoe-storeThis past trip we were short on time on our way out of town, but after an entire five seconds of reasoning with my mom about why we should stop, she was convinced. Lucky for us, because they had just gotten in a shipment of slightly out-of-season Birkenstock styles (which are actually produced with pretty sustainable materials, and last a long time) and mom found a great pair of *cute* but *comfy* walking shoes for her trip to Italy. There was also an entire wall of only slightly worn Frye boots at a fraction of the retail price!

discount-frye-boots

Gold mine, y’all.

discount-birkenstock

These guys were just waiting for me…and I’ve worn them literally every day since I bought them!

 

Want to Buy New? Here Are Some Sustainable Shoe Suggestions:

If I’m going to buy new shoes at full price, I do have pretty strict parameters on what I’ll put my money towards and trust my feet with. Here are a few that I lust over and am saving for:

  • Sevilla Smith
    • Handmade in either Philadelphia, PA or Barcelona, depending on where the shoemaker happens to be living at the time you order!
  • Aurora Shoes, NYC
    • Handmade in upstate New York
  • Bryr Clogs
    • Handmade in San Francisco!
  • Birkenstock (though I found sound out-of-season discount ones at Beaty’s!)
  • I get a lot of questions about sustainable exercise shoes – I pretty much exclusively buy unworn tennis shoes at places like Beaty’s or another thrift store (you’d be shocked what people buy, never wear, then give away…) just because I haven’t been able to find plastic-free shoes that I feel great about buying. If that’s not your thing, here’s an article from Eco Warrior Princess on some “sustainable” shoe brands – again – use your own judgement on what that means to you!

What are some of your favorite second-hand stores and how do you find them? Wherever you are, there is a probably a Lady Farmer nearby that would love to know!   Happy (sustainable) shopping! -Emma

 

 

 

How (and why!) to Wear the Sustainable Demeter Tunic

How (and why!) to Wear the Sustainable Demeter Tunic

It’s time to bring the most versatile of breezy sustainable garments back into your slow living rotation. With its blend of sustainable hemp, organic linen and hard-working design, our Demeter Tunic is one that Lady Farmers everywhere can’t stop reaching for.

Anna in the Demeter Tunic, in Natural (size Medium)

According to the Victoria & Albert Museum, while the men of the 17th century had pockets sewn directly into their breeches, women had to strap on pockets between layers of their petticoats. When women’s fashion started to favor more slim-fitted designs, women’s pockets became a thing of the past.

Not at Lady Farmer!

The first garment created for our Essential Collection, we named this tunic after the Greek goddess of agriculture. Our wide, deep pockets hold plant clippings and pruning shears, so it’s great for gardening. And for those quick errands, a trip to the farmer’s market or the park, you can always put your hands on your keys, phone, sunglasses and even that bag of toddler snacks!

The Demeter Tunic takes the phrase “hands-free” to a whole new level, and makes a slow living lifestyle that much more streamlined.

a-daily-somethingRebecca (@adailysomething) in the Demeter Tunic, in Gray (size Medium)

Airy, three-quarter sleeves and classic lines define the slightly oversized fit, without overwhelming any Lady Farmer’s shape. With gentle curves and a mid-thigh length, this sustainable tunic works alone on hot summer days or with light leggings so you stay protected from scratching branches or sticky kid fingers. When an extra layer is required, a turtleneck or long sleeved t-shirt makes the tunic an easy, cool weather, go-to choice. It also pairs perfectly with our striped Pomona Pants.

And when your Demeter Tunic does feel the bliss of a dirt smear or jammy kiss? Like all Lady Farmer sustainable garments, it will take a cold wash and can be hung dry or set at a low tumble. (Alpaca wool dryer balls are our favorite addition to a slow living, sustainable laundry routine.)

sustainable-tunicMary in the Demeter Tunic in Gray (size Medium), and Pomona Pants in Pinstripe (size Medium)

Each of our garments are produced with high-quality fabrics created to be as close to nature as possible. Because we believe in true sustainable clothing production and a slow living economy, we produce in small batches and keep inventory stocked at a minimum. Our supply changes as we keep up with your demand! In addition to our garments, we search for the best sustainable lifestyle products to bring into our store because we honor your intention to choose products that are better for you, your family and the planet. Thank you for shopping sustainably!

sustainable-tunic

Ready to shop? Explore The Essential Collection. Or see how Lady Farmers everywhere are wearing it with the #weareladyfarmer hashtag on Instagram.

Sustainable Fabric: The Quick and Dirty about Cotton

Sustainable Fabric: The Quick and Dirty about Cotton

Often when we think of sustainable fabric with natural fibers, we think of cotton. It is grown in America and marketed as one of the softest and most useful materials for our everyday needs. Many consider it a sustainable fabric choice for clothing and will choose it over synthetics and other blends. So, a label that says 100% Cotton might instill consumer confidence in the product. And it may communicate to the consumer that the product is safe and reliable. But, that’s a dangerous assumption to make.

What You Need to Know About Conventionally Grown Cotton, the World’s Dirtiest Crop

Despite it’s reputation as a natural choice for sustainable fabric and clothing, cotton is highly contaminated. Yes, you read that right! Cotton is NOT the product it is marketed to be.

A report by The Environmental Justice Foundation reveals the routine use of harmful chemicals, including nerve agents and neurotoxins, on cotton crops. And, according to the Organic Trade Association, as reported in an article by Dr. Joseph Mercola, “Cotton is considered the world’s ‘dirtiest’ crop due to its heavy use of insecticides, the most hazardous pesticide to human and animal health.”

He also reports, “Cotton covers 2.5% of the world’s cultivated land yet uses 16% of the world’s insecticides, more than any other single major crop. Aldicarb, parathion, and methamidopho, three of the most acutely hazardous insecticides to human health as determined by the World Health Organization, rank in the top ten most commonly used in cotton production. All but one of the remaining seven most commonly used are classified as moderately to highly hazardous. Aldicarb, cotton’s second best selling insecticide and most acutely poisonous to humans, can kill a man with just one drop absorbed through the skin, yet it is still used in 25 countries and the US, where 16 states have reported it in their groundwater.”

It’s Not Just the Crops

However, the problems with toxins in the cotton industry are not limited to just the cultivation of the crop.

The Organic Consumers Association (OCA) explains, “As an aid in harvesting, herbicides are used to defoliate the plants, making picking easier. More chemicals [are used] in the process of bleaching. Stain and odor resistance, fireproofing, and static- and wrinkle-reduction. Some of the softeners and detergents leave a residue that will not totally be removed from the final product. Chemicals often used for finishing include formaldehyde, caustic soda, sulfuric acid, bromines, urea resins, sulfonamides, halogens, and bromines.”

Our skin is our largest organ and absorbs what we put on our bodies. It makes sense that we would want to avoid this kind of toxic exposure for ourselves and our children. So, what can we do?

Sustainable Fabric

Organic Cotton is a Sustainable Fabric and Safer Alternative

According to the Organic Trade Commission, “Organic cotton is grown without the use of toxic and persistent pesticides and synthetic fertilizers. In addition, federal regulations prohibit the use of genetically engineered seed for organic farming. All cotton sold as organic in the United States must meet strict federal regulations covering how the cotton is grown.

It’s true that clothing made from organic cotton will most likely cost you more. The cultivation of sustainable crops require investments and methods outside of  conventional industry practices.  This means greater costs and lower margins for the producers. Organic cotton farmers are using sustainable practices in their efforts to protect the environment and avoid chemical use. They are also maintaining soil fertility, preserving biodiversity and conserving water.

Always Choose Organic Cotton for Babies and Children

Consumers seeking more sustainable options might take these factors into consideration when making purchasing decisions. Some think it’s worth the extra cost to avoid the health and environmental problems that come with conventionally grown cotton. But, you might be limited in your ability to afford sustainable products in all of your clothing purchases.  If this is the case, please consider organic cotton over conventional for your babies and young children. Because of their developing brains and organs, they are more susceptible than adults to the harm of these toxins.

We’re committed to guiding you in your sustainable lifestyle journey. Click HERE to get free information, resources and updates from Lady Farmer.

Sustainable Fabrics

Sustainable Shopping with Lady Farmer

Unveiling Fashion: Inaugural Sustainable Fashion Conference in the Nation’s Capital a Huge Success!

Unveiling Fashion: Inaugural Sustainable Fashion Conference in the Nation’s Capital a Huge Success!

Sustainable Fashion is getting buzz in Washington, DC!

DC-Sustainable-Fashion-Collective

Sustainable Fashion Conference

Last September 2018, Lady Farmer was excited to be a part of Unveiling Fashion, Conversations about Fashion and Sustainability, a sold-out event hosted by the newly formed DC Sustainable Fashion Collective less than a year after launching their organization. Designers, writers, lawmakers, activists, entrepreneurs and fashion professionals from across the industry came together to discuss the negative impact of the current industry on our fellow man and the planet, its effect on their daily lives, and how they can implement sustainable changes in their lives and their neighborhoods.

The day was loaded with information and discussions, including a keynote address by Lauren Fay, Executive Director of Fashion Revolution USA, presentations by Whitney Bauck, Assistant Editor of Fashionista Magazine and Marci Zaroff, Founder & CEO of Metawear Manufacturing. In addition, there were four panels covering various subjects in the broad realm of sustainable fashion. Lady Farmer joined panelists Diana Watts of Trinity Washington University, Kaveri Marathe, co-founder of a textile recycling business called Texiles, and Amy Dufault of the Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator in discussing The Consumer Trap (Buying Things You Don’t Need and Why). What is the impact of the current levels of consumption and its far-reaching economic effects around the world?

DC Sustainable Fashion Collective

The DC Sustainable Fashion Collective is a community-based organization, whose purpose is to foster and educate consumers in the D.C. Metropolitan Area on the importance of sustainability and ethical practices in the fashion industry. Established in January 2018, DCSFC is poised to develop educational programs, retail opportunities, workforce development/training initiatives, and networking opportunities for the local creative, sustainable and ethical communities.

Sustainable Fashion Movement

The level of participation in this lively and successful first-time event indicates that there is a keen and growing interest in the sustainable fashion movement. In our efforts to educate and inform consumers on the existing issues in the apparel industry, as well as to provide responsibly sourced and manufactured alternatives to fast fashion, we at Lady Farmer are delighted to join this organization in spreading the word!

Women’s Empowerment: Refuse Fast Fashion and Change the World

Women’s Empowerment: Refuse Fast Fashion and Change the World

We’re living in amazing times. Women are changing the world with their courage to speak out, take a stand, and act outside of a male dominated paradigm.  We listen to unfolding events and yes, we feel the surfacing of deep anger and frustration at the status quo, but at the same time we feel hope and inspiration because we know that there is a movement.

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photo: Natalie Chanin of Alabama Chanin by Peter Strangmayr

We believe so deeply in making change! We want to do something. But sometimes we get stuck. Beyond watching disturbing telecasts that entrench our convictions, posting on social media to people that already agree with us and traveling to events that we hope will amplify our voices--what do we do?  Well, here is something huge you can do to help the cause of women’s empowerment–every single day. 

1) REFUSE Fast Fashion

stop fast fashion

Yes, that’s it. There are few things reflecting women’s disempowerment on such a broad scale as the clothing industry. It doesn’t show up that often on social media and is not being televised on cable TV twenty-four-seven, but it’s something in which practically every single one of us is a participant. Yes, it sounds overwhelming– but it is every bit within your power to RESIST, starting now.  Start with that T-shirt you have that proclaims the power of women and find out where it came from. In all likelihood, it was sewn by a woman who does not earn a living wage, who possibly has to live away from her children to have this work, who cannot afford adequate food, health care or child care.  Please do not wear this shirt or buy it for your sisters or daughters or book club until you confirm the truth behind it.

fast fashion human rights - effects of fast fashion

80% of garment workers in the fashion industry are women. Fast Fashion is a women’s issue.

who made my clothes fashion revolution - empower women

the cost of fast fashion

2) STOP perpetuating this behemoth of a broken system that enslaves women.

Is the fast fashion industry really that bad? Yes, it’s really that bad, and the worst of it is that the vast majority of people are literally buying into this system daily without even realizing what they’re doing. Don’t be one of those that doesn’t know. You can read all about fast fashion and its devastating impact here or here or here.

what is fast fashion

fast fashion alternatives

3) DO seek, find and support fast fashion alternatives.

Once you know, please don’t make excuses for not using the power of your choice. There is nothing that can change things in our economy faster or more affirmatively than the informed consumer. If you want to be truly invested in the empowerment of women, it is necessary for you to know this truth.

We’re doing our best at Lady Farmer to educate and provide consumers with alternatives in their clothing choices. There are also some great lists and blogs online that will guide you, such as this one and this one.

women's empowerment - stop fast fashion

Want to empower women every single day?  Be a part of this movement by exercising the power of your consumer choices and refusing fast fashion.

Pin it!

Refuse Fast Fashion // Empower Women + Change the World

How to Shop at Thrift Stores: 5 Tips For Finding Thrift Store Gems

How to Shop at Thrift Stores: 5 Tips For Finding Thrift Store Gems

Successful thrift store shopping doesn’t have to be fully a game of luck. Thrifting helps your wallet, your community, and your planet…but my favorite part is the search itself: I feel like I’m on a sort of adventure, looking for a gem in a messy jungle of fabric. The normal dopamine rush that I get from shopping is doubled when I’m thrifting: after taking time to explore, finding the piece that matches your style and size perfectly is incredibly gratifying.

How to Shop at Thrift Stores

Right now, I’m wearing Dansko clogs, Patagonia shorts, an Urban Outfitters shirt, Victoria’s Secret underwear and bra, and I spent less than $8.00 for the entire outfit.

As a self-proclaimed thrifting connoisseur, playing the “how much did I pay for this outfit” game is one of my favorite pastimes. I’m in college, and only have a part-time job during the school year–I don’t exactly have a large margin of disposable income. But thankfully, my hours spent in consignment shops has taught me that you don’t need to spend big bucks to look great!

Even if you do have enough money to buy name-brand clothing regularly, there are so many reasons to go thrifting instead! For one, it supports your local economy: buying an Old Navy dress at a consignment shop downtown supports a local business, instead of zooming directly up to a giant company. And many thrift stores are charity-based organizations that will use their profits to support local causes–I’ve been to stores that support hospitals, churches, after school programs, community centers, and more.

Shopping second-hand is also worlds more environmentally friendly. Imagine this: A woman goes into an expensive retailer and buys a blouse. Her money is supporting the production of A synthetic-blend textile, the pollutive process of dying the fabric, the factory assembly of the garment, and the shipping from overseas to the checkout counter. For one reason or another, it eventually is tossed in a trash bag labeled “donate,” and taken to Goodwill.

Fingering your way down a rack of tops, you find the blouse and take it home. It’s still cute, still high-quality material, and still a recognizable brand. But you pay a fraction of the price, and none of your money supports processes that exploit people or the land!

Thrift Store Shopping Tips

After getting my clothes almost exclusively second-hand for years, I have a few tips for finding the hidden treasures of consignment shops without wasting time. It doesn’t need to be a struggle or a 3-hour commitment!

1) Research where the good spots are to go.

Ask around about where people recommend shopping second-hand. It’s hard for people to accurately review thrift stores online, so word-of-mouth is valuable here. Some general advice from me is to go to the wealthier neighborhoods’ consignment shops; people who live and work in more affluent parts of town will typically drop off their donations close to home, and these spots tend to have a higher concentration of expensive brand names. (A side note for my friends down in the Southeast–Unclaimed Baggage in Alabama is by far the greatest spot to shop, with high-end clothes that can be over 80% off! Definitely worth a couple of hours in the car.)

2) Go early in the week, in the early afternoon.

As you start shopping at new thrift stores, ask the employees when they sort through new donations–Most places will sort through donations early in the week, and bring it out on the floor in the mornings. But always double check! Schedules vary, and you want to be one of the first people to look through their new clothing.

3) For a quick trip, know what you need.

If you just want a rapid, in-and-out trip, you need to shop with intention. Know what you need, run in and flit through the rack or two the store has. If you find what you wanted, great! But the more specific your expectations, the harder it’ll be to find, and you may have to go to a few different shops.

4) Save discernment for the dressing room.

Something about pre-loved garments make it difficult to tell if they’ll look good on or not; half the time I absolutely fall in love with something that I only mildly liked on the rack, or end up hating I thought was really cute at a glance. It’s hard to tell! So if I have the time to delve more into a store, I keep some flexible ideas of what I want in terms of fabric type, color, and brand, but give most clothes a shot. And as soon as I step into the dressing room, I kick my judgmental side into high gear to make sure I only walk away with clothes that I love and will wear regularly. It can be deceivingly easy to leave lugging armloads of stuff that you don’t really need, and the place to prevent that is in the dressing room.

5) Always check the non-clothing sections.

A quick walkabout through the kitchen section and a glance through the purses can yield incredible results, and it’s always the fastest part of my trip! I would never have found my black leather Coach handbag if I hadn’t left the clothing section. And although I only fantasize at this point about my one-day kitchen, I am positive that it will be composed of mostly second-hand goods. I’ve found mason jars, cobalt glasses, complete fondue sets, pressure cookers, and more just by quickly walking past and glancing at the shelves. Incredibly easy, and incredibly worth it.

I hope that these tips will help you explore the exciting thrifting world! Second-hand shopping is a great way to vote with your dollar against fast-fashion, prevent textile waste, and save money. Best of luck, and happy hunting! 🙂

– Vanessa Moss, 2018 Summer Intern 

Save the Soil with Farm to Fashion: Central Grazing Company (Really Cute Handbags!)

Save the Soil with Farm to Fashion: Central Grazing Company (Really Cute Handbags!)

Yes, we know that leather is an animal byproduct, and the whole tanning process is not a pretty one. So why do we support leather companies like our friends at Farrier and now Central Grazing Company?

lady-farmer-regenerative-leather

Because the leather we support is sourced from regenerative cattle (and sheep!) farming, which like fiber farming (wool, hemp, flax, organic cotton, etc..) has the potential to heal our soils and change our world. Literally.

Recent reports are claiming that there are an average of 60 harvests left on the earth if soil degradation continues. Agriculture remains one of the top contributors to soil loss and increased atmospheric carbon. In order to stop the rapid loss of our soil and sequester carbon, change must take place on all levels, from lawmakers to farmers, brands, investors, consumers and innovative entrepreneurs.

That’s why we’re excited to tell you about Jacqueline Smith, the founder of Central Grazing Company, a women-led, regenerative food and fiber business committed to farming methods that actually build vital soil!

Jacqueline and her team are pioneers in the regenerative agricultural movement and are committed to changing the way we approach food and fiber products. She has designed a program that pays farmers premiums for high animal welfare and ecological standards. This gives farmers incentives to farm in ways that build soil, help balance the carbon cycle and gives animals peaceful, calm and natural lives.

Over the past few years, Jacqueline has been working to create a new farm-to-fashion leather line that comes from her certified Animal Welfare Approved sheep raised in the Midwest. Not only that, she has them tanned and manufactured in the U.S. Because of her closed-loop production process, her leather collection is 100% traceable. How incredible is that?

She is raising funds to launch her new consciously made leather line, and we’re so excited they’ve almost reached their goal! Let’s help them surpass it… You can see her Kickstarter campaign here.

Ethical leather is changing the clothing industry. By purchasing, gifting, supporting or promoting CGC’s full range of leather pieces, you, too, can help grow the climate-benefiting fashion revolution.

Jacqueline’s campaign will be running until June 10th. Every little bit helps. There are all kinds of rewards including deeply reduced prices on her amazing leather pieces! Sign up here for her newsletter for more details.

Also, if you would like to review their leather products, learn more about their process or simply to share this feel-good story, please reach out to Jacqueline@centralgrazingco.com. She’d welcome your feedback and, of course, appreciate your helping to spread the word! We found this FAQ page really helpful and informative…check it out! 

Happy revolution-ing!

Love,

Emma & Mary

lady-farmer-regenerative-leather

Fashion Revolution Week 2108

Fashion Revolution Week 2108

Lady Farmer wants YOU to join the Fashion Revolution!

It’s been five years now since the collapse of the Rana Plaza garment factory in Dhaka, Bangladesh on April 24th,2013. Over 1,000 workers died and another 2,500 were injured when the eight-story building, known to be unstable, came crashing down on employees that were sent to work in spite of a large crack that had been identified in the walls. Now known as the worst disaster in the history of fashion, the event opened the world’s eyes to the grim realities of the apparel industry. Though blame might have been largely placed on local standards and regulations, most Americans had only to look in their closets to recognize our country’s complicity in the tragedy, as many major north American brands were made at Rana Plaza, including J.C. Penny, Walmart, North Face and Benetton.

Each anniversary is now highlighted by a global awareness campaign known as “Fashion Revolution Week,”during which consumers worldwide are encouraged to ask the brands #whomademyclothes? It’s an easy but powerful step on the part of the masses that have allowed the fast fashion machine to become a reality such as Rana Plaza, a simple exercise in consciousness and inquiry.

We ask of ourselves and the brands who make our clothes:

  • Whose hands measured and cut the cloth, sewed the pieces together just so and added the buttons or trim that caught our eye in the first place? Most likely it was a woman.
  • Is she a mother?
  • Where is her child while she’s at work?
  • How far does she have to travel to the factory every day?
  • Does she make enough to live in clean and safe housing and to provide her household with food?

These are simple and reasonable questions. In asking them, we’re not trying to move all of apparel production out of these countries and shut down her job. We’re not trying to take away her only means of income. But we do want to make it clear to these large companies that their lack of transparency in the supply chain will not work anymore. Consumers all over the world are making their buying decisions based not on price and quantity, but integrity of materials and production. In doing so, producers will have to comply with the demands of an increasingly discerning public and make the changes necessary to prevent the Rana Plaza incidents of the future.

Want to be part of the Fashion Revolution? It’s easy. All you have to do is ask #whomademyclothes?

lady farmer on the runway

The Lady Farmer Essential Collection Line on the runway! Made in the USA using fair trade practices and of materials that are natural and biodegradable, the Lady Farmer Essential Collection is our own project in manufacturing in a way we feel good about.