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Slow Living Challenge – Week #2 – Slow Food

Feb 23, 2020 | Kitchen, Slow Living

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This week, we’re talking about food, but not just any food.

We’re taking a look at real food, what it is, and why it’s important and how you can bring more of it into your life.

So what what is slow food to you? Does that mean a home cooked meal? Hand grown veggies? A leisurely meal enjoyed alone or shared with loved ones?

Slow food starts with real food. It hasn’t been through any kind of factory processing, packaged in cardboard or plastic, preserved or flavored with unpronounceable chemicals, or traveled long distances. Real food is simple, fresh and seasonal. Ideally, it’s one ingredient (or less than five) and you know where it came from and how it was grown, raised or produced. The fewer stops between the soil that supported it and your plate, the better.

Real food is simple, fresh and seasonal.

Ideally, it’s one ingredient (or less than five) and you know where it came from and how it was grown, raised or produced. The fewer stops between the soil that supported it and your plate, the better.

Yes, it’s a lot to consider when at the grocery store! But the closer to this real food you can get, the more nutrient dense it is, and with less chemicals. There is no giant industry between you and real food. It has a much shorter journey from the earth to you, and is easy to find if you know where to look!

Plan at least one meal this week using seasonal foods and ingredients that are as close to their natural state as possible.

Choices might include organically grown fruits, vegetables, and grains, grass-fed and/or pasture raised meat, wild caught seafood, farm fresh dairy. Ideally, find foods that are locally sourced, if available.

If the supermarket is your usual go-to, you might take this opportunity to seek out other sources, such as a farmer’s market, a local buying club or small grocery that sources from nearby. When shopping, avoid foods that come in a bag, box, can or carton with a long list of additives and preservatives. The closer to one ingredient, the better.Welcome to EditPad.org – your online plain text editor. Enter or paste your text here. To download and save it, click on the button below.

Set aside a special time to prepare this meal.

It doesn’t have to take a long time, just try to cut out distractions and the tendency to rush and multi-task. As you handle the ingredients and go through the steps of making something to nourish yourself and perhaps others, contemplate where the food came from and what had to take place in order for you to have it.

Appreciate the rain, sun and soil that allowed it to grow, the hands that tended it, the effort that made it possible for you to have it. Notice colors, textures, sounds and smells as you work.

Whether you re enjoying this meal by yourself or with others, try eating it with your full attention.

As you take a bite of something, let it linger in your mouth as you feel it’s texture, experience it’s taste and smell.

Think about and appreciate all of the systems of your body that will transform this food into fuel for your body, so that you can be nourished and live. Write about your experience if you wish.

Enjoy the benefits of this real food meal.

What observations do you have about the experience? Did you feel less rushed in preparing for it? Did it taste better? Did you share it with others? See how many times you can expand this practice to more meals this week, and moving forward!

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